City lowers speed limit on E. Trinity

Posted 8/20/19

The Madisonville City Council voted Thursday night to lower the speed limit on East Trinity St. near downtown to 20 miles per hour to address safety concerns along the route.

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City lowers speed limit on E. Trinity

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The Madisonville City Council voted Thursday night to lower the speed limit on East Trinity St. near downtown to 20 miles per hour to address safety concerns along the route.

As previously reported, a pedestrian/vehicle incident near Standley Feed and Seed spurred a request from Susan Standley to improve the safety on the street. City officials considered a variety of options, including a speed bump and a crosswalk.

Thursday evening, City Manager Camilla Viator presented council with the proposed solution or lowering the speed limit and putting up yellow signs to warn drivers of pedestrian traffic.

“We just want to give [drivers] a heads up,” Viator told the council.

Mayor Bill Parten and others expressed concern that pedestrians around that area also need more awareness about safety. Parten said he was traveling on East Trinity recently and two men were standing in the middle of the street conversing.

“Twice in the last week, this has happened,” Parten said. “[One of the men] was not even paying attention and walked right in front of me.”

The new signage will cost around $200, Viator said. Council member Russell Bailey suggested the measures might need expansion in the future.

“I think this is a good first step,” he said. “I think we should do this and see what we may need to do later.”

The council also approved a new permitting process for parades and other special events in the city in order to keep public officials informed of planned events, coordinate with potential other events, facilitate the use of city personnel and inform organizers of their responsibilities.

“This is something we realized that other cities do, and we don’t,” Viator said. “If someone wants to have a parade, they have to tell us in advance, and we need to let them know what it costs the city.”

The permit is free, but will help inform organizers that they need to pay for the cost of any needed police officers for traffic or security, as well as their responsibility to clean any city property used.

“They need to know they’re responsible for picking up the trash,” Viator said. “They may not be aware of what it takes to put on an event downtown or in the park.”

When an applicant comes in for a permit, Viator said they’d be told “pretty quickly” if their permit is approved or denied. And added that the permit is designed to accommodate changes, according to the event.

“There’s nothing in there that can’t be waived,” she said.

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